Keeping a gratitude journal is a great way to practice gratitudeHow to Hero: Your Gratitude Practice

8 years ago, I bought a car. It was a lovely Toyota Aygo. A red one, with white stripes. Best racing car ever. It went by the name Chuckie. Named after Chuck Norris, not the creepy doll.
 
Anyway, all of a sudden I would see Aygos everywhere. All the time. As if somehow the whole world switched to the Aygo.
 
I mean, I know the Aygo is a popular car and I’m quite a trendsetter (* ahum *), but this was a bit extreme.
 
Of course, what had actually happened is that I started paying more attention to Aygos. I would notice them, while every Volkswagen, Volvo and even BMW would blend into one big ball of ‘other cars’.
 
But the more I focused on Aygos, the more Aygos I saw.
 
Which is exactly why gratitude practice is so important.
 
Not because you have to be grateful for owning an Aygo (or be grateful for not owning an Aygo) 😛
 
But just like with cars, you can train your mind to pay attention to things you’re grateful for.
 
For instance…
 
When I’m having a bad day, there’s not enough nature in the city. I’m once again working in a busy coffeeshop. And the traffic just sucks.
 
On good days, I’m grateful for small flowers finding their way through concrete walls. For the flavor of Jasmin tea. For the car driver stopping to let me cross the street in a busy street.
 
Now what day would make you feel more capable of accomplishing your goals? A day where everything seems to go wrong or a day where there is so much to just be grateful for?
 
Exactly.
 
Luckily, there’s a pretty easy practice to rewire your mind into noticing the beauty of life and creating this abundance mindset. It’s called a gratitude journal.
 
Don’t worry though, you don’t really need a journal. All you need is paper and a pen. A notebook will do, but honestly you can use your planner or even your phone.
 
Here goes the extremely long, detailed and complicated instruction (brace yourselves):
 
Every day, list at least three things you’re grateful for on that particular day. (Don’t stop at 1 because having to find more will challenge you to look past the obvious.)
 
That’s it. Really.
 
Okay, not really. But it’s all you need to start. Later this week I’m going to share a few tips to make your gratitude practice easier and more effective.
 
And before you know it, you’ll be rewiring your mind to notice how much you’ve got (and how much you have to give).
 
In the mean time, want to start together? What three things are you grateful for today?
 
Today, I’m grateful for
 
1. …
2. …
3. …